Army Tanks

Developed secretly by the Germans in the 1920s, despite being subject to constraints under the treaty of Versailles, the Pak-35/36 Rheinmetall anti-tank gun fired an armor piercing round of 1.457inches (37mm) caliber at a muzzle velocity of 2,500ft/s (762m/s).

The round weighed 24oz (680g) and was capable of penetrating 2.2in (56mm) of armor at 220yards (200m).

The combined weight of the gun and its carriage were 880(lb) 400kg.

Pak 35/36 Rheinmetall anti-tank gunIt had a wide range of movement, shielding and coil spring suspension.

11,200 units had been made by 1939.

The Pak 35/36 originally used AP40 ammunition. However, during World War II, shortages this ammunition developed. This was because it was made of tungsten and the Germans needed to use the limited amount of tungsten that they had for the production of machine tools.

In 1942, the Germans introduced the Stielgranate 42, a muzzle-loaded projectile, that could be used with the Pak 35/36 instead of AP40 ammunition.